Factors Affecting Bee Pollination of Tree Fruits

Wednesday Apr 15, 2020

Nearly 1,000 species of bees occur in the Pacific Northwest, but only a small number of species are useful in the pollination of orchard crops. Pesticide use and loss of appropriate nesting habitat have reduced the numbers of wild bee pollinators, leaving most of the pollination for commercial orchards dependent on honeybees. The success of honeybee pollination in tree fruits is affected by a number of factors, which in part can be manipulated by orchardists and beekeepers.

Degree-Day Models

Wednesday Apr 08, 2020

Have you ever wondered why different pests have different degree-day sums? Here is why:

How to Effectively Manage Codling Moth

Wednesday Apr 08, 2020

Without any intervention, codling moth numbers increase about four-fold from generation to generation. Therefore, targeting the first generation is important to reset the population size to a minimum. Control measures for subsequent generations can be adjusted to the local pest pressure indicated by trap counts.

San Jose Scale Management

Wednesday Apr 01, 2020

San Jose scale is a relatively easy pest to control, but a dangerous one to leave uncontrolled. After a few years of infestation, limbs and even entire trees can be killed if heavily attacked, and high percentages of the fruit can be infested. Large trees are most often associated with scale problems, because of the suitable habitat they provide and the difficulty of obtaining good spray coverage. However, young trees can also develop a scale problem surprisingly quickly. San Jose scale is a pest that is easily prevented, but hard to control if the populations have built up too much.

Cherry Powdery Mildew Symptoms

Powdery Mildew of Cherry: Fungicide Resistance Management Guidelines Spring 2019

Wednesday Apr 01, 2020

Cherry growers in the Pacific Northwest have multiple fungicides at their disposal for managing powdery mildew. Products in the powdery mildew “toolbox” include members of the DMI, QoI, SDHI, quinolone synthetic compounds and multiple “contact” fungicides from other classes (e.g. sulfur and narrow range petroleum oils). A more inclusive list of fungicides is presented in the table below. The table includes fungicide class information, Fungicide Resistance Action Committee (FRAC) group number or code, and resistance risk.